Monthly Archives: November 2014

Regional Meeting at ARCA training centre Rayleigh Essex Tomorrow

regional meetingThe ATaC team will be hosting our next regional meeting for our members at the ARCA training centre Rayleigh Essex, tomorrow.

The aims of our regional meetings are to engage with our members and ensure that we are on hand to answer any questions they might have. We intend to host as many regional meetings as necessary in order to ensure that all our members have the chance to join us.

If you would be interested in attending the regional meetings, please call us on 01283 566467 or alternatively email us at: info@atac.org.uk. Read more

News on the new Analyst Guide HSG 248

The Committee for Fibre Measurement (CFM) are having a meeting at the beginning of December where a draft copy of the consultation document will be discussed. This will be an internal assessment of the guidance.

The consultation document should then be available to laboratories to assess and make comments on early 2015. So in reality the guidance itself will not be issued until earliest summer 2015. Read more

School safety information to be discussed at conference

A range of safety-related subjects in and out of the classroom will be discussed at a conference in Lancashire, the conference will focus on school safety.asbestos in schools

The Institution of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) is concerned about the large number of children and teachers studying in school buildings containing asbestos.

Teachers and educationalists will hear how they can make pupils and themselves safer at an event organised by IOSH.

The event, called Embracing Risk in Education – a Fresh Approach, has been organised jointly by IOSH’s Education and Fire Risk Management groups. It will be held at Burnley FC’s Turf Moor stadium on Wednesday November 19.

It will benefit teachers, school bursars, health and safety professionals, managers and all of those in the occupational health and safety professions.

They will hear about the best measures of managing asbestos in schools where it is present. These measures include having regular surveys and encapsulating or sealing the asbestos. Read more

Regional meetings for our ATaC members – 26th of November

The ATaC team will be hosting our next regional meeting for our members on the 26th  November at ARCA training centre Rayleigh Essex.

The aims of our regional meetings are to engage with our members and ensure that we are on hand to answer any questions they might have. We intend to host as many regional meetings as necessary in order to ensure that all our members have the chance to join us.

If you would be interested in attending the regional meetings, please call us on 01283 566467 or alternatively email us at: info@atac.org.uk.

We look forward to hearing from our members! Until then, we will keep you posted with updates here on our blog. Read more

No time to lose: IOSH launch major campaign to get the causes of occupational cancer better understood

IOSH has launched a major campaign to get the causes of occupational cancer better understood and help businesses take action. Phil Bates, senior policy and technical adviser at IOSH, sheds a light on this overlooked health threat and explains why IOSH is targeting five major causes.

No time to lose: IOSH launch major campaignAccording to HSE there were 148 in Britain in 2012/13, each one tragic and avoidable. This is, however, less than two per cent of the bigger picture – the total figure for work-related fatalities every year in Britain is some 12,000.

Workplace exposures leading to occupational illness are behind this breathtaking figure, and work-related cancers account for 8,000, according to HSE reports. Of these, half are contracted from exposure to the biggest work cancer killer, asbestos, with the other 4,000 down to exposures to other, lesser-known carcinogens.

IOSH’s No Time to Lose campaign, launched on the 3rd of November, throws a spotlight on work cancer because it is the barely visible cause of an unbearably high number of deaths. It is barely visible broadly for two reasons – the literal invisibility of the carcinogens and the latency of their effects.

Some cancers are diagnosed up to 10 years after the sufferer has been exposed, often unknowingly, to a carcinogen at work. Others can take more than 35 years to develop.This is why it is wrong to assume cases of occupational cancer only occur when people have retired. Around a quarter of deaths and registrations from occupational cancer occur before the age of 65, with some losing their battle with the disease when still in their 30s. Others will be delivered a slower death sentence, with victims suffering an ever-shrinking quality of life at a time when they should be getting ready to enjoy a well-earned retirement. Read more