Category Archives: Asbestos in Schools

Councils pay out £10m for school asbestos claims

BBC Article

Councils in England have paid out at least £10m in compensation to people who developed illnesses because of asbestos in school buildings.

Figures obtained by BBC News show that in the past decade 32 councils have settled claims from former teachers, school staff or pupils.

The National Union of Teachers says up to 300 adults die each year because of exposure to asbestos while at school.

The full article is on the BBC website

Is your child at risk from asbestos at school?

More than seven million schoolchildren are learning in asbestos-riddled classrooms. New research has revealed that the home counties are the most deadly areas in the country outside London, with more than 200,000 youngsters at risk in Kent alone. In the capital a heart-stopping 1.2m children attend asbestos-riddled schools, according to figures obtained from a Freedom of Information request.

Full article at www.express.co.uk

Increase of deaths caused by mesothelioma in the Education Sector

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have released the latest mesothelioma statistics for the Education Sector.

Increase of deaths caused by mesothelioma in the Education SectorAccording to statistics the death of teachers caused by mesothelioma is on the rise, it has been recorded that 177 school teachers have died of mesothelioma since 2001.

Mesothelioma is a formally rare form of cancer that principally affects the pleura (the external lining of the lung) and the peritoneum (the lining of the lower digestive tract). Many cases of mesothelioma are diagnosed at an advanced stage as symptoms are non-specific and appear late in the development of the disease. It is almost always fatal with most of those affected usually dying within twelve months of diagnosis.

Asbestos is responsible for causing the vast majority of mesothelioma cases in Great Britain. There are currently about five times as many deaths in men as there are in women each year. This is largely a reflection of the fact that past asbestos exposures that caused many of these deaths tended to occur in occupational settings, and in jobs mainly held by men rather than women.

Although still caused by asbestos, a minority of currently occurring female deaths are directly attributable to occupational exposures. The continuing increase in annual mesothelioma deaths is a consequence of the effect of past exposures and the long latency period of the disease (i.e. the time between initial exposure to asbestos and the manifestation of mesothelioma) which is typically between 30 and 40 years. Read more